Coronavirus: Daily update


Here are five things you need to know about coronavirus disease this Saturday morning. We also have an update for you tomorrow.

1. India recorded the lowest number of daily cases in 45 days

India reported the lowest one -day increase in coronavirus cases in 45 days, according to the health ministry. On Saturday, the country recorded 173,790 new cases, continuing the downward trend of the past two weeks. Another 3,617 deaths were recorded. The country was hit by a devastating second wave, with more than 320,000 deaths, according to the health ministry – the third highest in the world, behind the US and Brazil. The wave hit the healthcare system, with people who have difficulty getting hospital beds, oxygen and drugs and crematoriums were emptied.





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2. Music festivals are afraid of losing the summer

A government refusal to provide a safety net for live events means music festivals are facing a lost summer, a committee of MPs said. Several festivals have been sought – including Glastonbury and BST Hyde Park – with some blaming the inability to get insurance cover for cancellations related to Covid. The digital, culture, media and sport selection committee says the government has refused to consider offering support until all coronavirus bans are lifted, but that date – June 21 at the latest – is too late for at the holidays this summer. Committee chairman Julian Knight said the festivals needed to be known now “whether the government would support them”.



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3. Holiday travel is expected as soon as the restrictions

The arrival of the rainy season – finally – is accompanied by the first bank holiday as the holiday and tourism ban is made to understand. fast weekend travel. RAC research suggests up to 10.8 million car trips will take place in the UK between Friday and Monday. Ben Aldous from RAC said “there are many times when the weather has the last word on how busy the roads are” but he added that Saturday and Monday are expected to see the most traffic. The bank holiday temperature is due to reach 25C in some places, following a spring that is cooler than usual.



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4. Covid-hit restaurants are asking for a delay in calorie counting

A restaurant industry hit by lockdowns in the UK is demanding plan to add calorie count to menus to delay, said they need a lot of time to recover from the pandemic. Owners fear the move will add to their costs by the time they can’t afford it. It is designed to help tackle obesity and will be available in restaurants, cafes and takeaways with more than 250 staff from April 2022. Kate Nicholl, chief executive of trade body UK Hospitality, says many businesses are “in survival mode” and the government should delay rather than “impose new costs for businesses”.



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5. Wing as a teenager returns to school after 448 days

The first day back to school is always tough, especially if you’ve lost 448 days like Fintan Hood. Classmates at Kingsley School in north Devon lined up to applaud as the 16-year-old, who was shielded by the autoimmune condition, returned to class.. Fintan’s father, Andy Hood, said it was an “incredible” welcome. And Fintan himself offers a balanced analysis of the pros and cons of home study: “I’m going to get out of bed and just squeeze in‘ joining ’Zoom, but I think it’s worth it here. here in person, to see everyone again.



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And don’t forget …

A ban on evictions during the pandemic ended in England on 1 June. If you are a tenant whose income has fallen because of Covid-19, you can read about the notice periods and protections HERE.

You can find more information, advice and instructions with us coronavirus page.



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